Protesters who occupied president’s office receive felony charges

Thirteen individuals, including 12 protesters and a Daily reporter, who were detained by the Stanford Department of Public Safety (SUDPS) and the County Sheriff’s Office, were charged with felony burglary. Protesters barricaded themselves inside the president and provost’s office, located in Building 10 in Main Quad, early Wednesday morning.

Students were suspended and banned from campus for the rest of the quarter until June 12, as the University processes disciplinary referrals to the Office of Community Standards (OCS). Any who are seniors will not be allowed to graduate. Bail for arrested individuals was set to $20,000.

Several protesters and the Daily reporter were released on bail Wednesday night. They were detained for approximately 15 hours.

After entering the building at around 5:30 a.m., protesters blocked doors and windows with bike locks, chains, ladders and chairs and covered security cameras with tin foil. No administrators or staff were present inside when protesters entered. They occupied the office for under two hours before they were removed by SUDPS and escorted away in vans. 

The group, who said they planned to stay in the building until demands were met or they were forcibly removed, demanded three actions by the University: to add the divestment bill submitted by Stanford Against Apartheid in Palestine (SAAP) to the next Board of Trustees meeting with a recommendation of support from President Richard Saller, to commit to financial disclosure from the previous fiscal year (2022) including endowment investments and to drop all disciplinary and criminal charges against pro-Palestine students at Stanford.

The protesters are part of an autonomous group of Stanford students unaffiliated with any voluntary student organization (VSO), according to organizers.

Protesters who entered the building said they were prepared to be arrested. An organizer “stated that they’re making an informed decision and that this is something that they feel inclined to do because of the sense of urgency,” a spokesperson for the group told The Daily. She requested anonymity due to fear of retaliation.

The University condemned the actions of protesters. Saller and Provost Jenny Martinez wrote they were “appalled and deeply saddened” in a letter circulated to the Stanford community Wednesday morning.

Oriana Riley contributed reporting.